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Monthly Archives

November 2018

Cooking With Sensei – Herb Roasted Turkey Breast Cutlets

By Diet and Nutrition, TSK No Comments

Cooking With Sensei - Herb Roasted Turkey Breast Cutlets

Here’s a quick and easy holiday meal without all of the fuss!

Quick & Easy Herb Roasted Turkey Breast Cutlets Recipe

    • Preheat the oven to 375°
    • Rinse turkey breast and pat dry
    • In a small bowl combine the oil, garlic, herbs, salt,pepper and rub the mixture into the turkey breast cutlets. 
    • Transfer cutlets into a roasting pan and roast until the cutlets have an opaque color after 20-30 minutes. 
    • Serve with a healthy side of veggies or a lighter carb. 



Ingredients For Herb Roasted Turkey Breast Cutlets

  • 4 half-inch thick turkey breast cutlets
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 4 cloves of garlic crushed
  • 4 teaspoons of chopped fresh sage leaves
  • 2 tablespoons of chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon of salt

Cooking With Sensei – Purple Sweet Potato Pie

By Diet and Nutrition, TSK No Comments


Cooking With Sensei - Purple Sweet Potato Pie
This week we are going to be taking advantage of one of the most beautiful root vegetables – the purple potato to remake a holiday classic.  We’re spicing the classic sweet potato pie with a little twist. First we’ll substitute sweet potatoes for colorful purple potatoes, and for the grown folks – we’re going to add a shot of brandy which adds another layer of seasonal flavor.

Making your own pie crust could be very rewarding but very time consuming, so in order to save time we used a whole wheat pie crust we bought from the store. This gave us plenty of time to focus on the pie filling. 

Purple Sweet Potato Pie Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ pounds of purple sweet potatoes scrubbed and washed -1 can of low-fat evaporated milk
  • 2/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons of melted butter cooled
  • 2 tablespoons of brandy
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon of ground allspice
  • ½ a teaspoon of salt

Sensei Tip: Serve this pie with the dollar lightly sweetened with cream. 

Quick & Easy Recipe For Purple Sweet Potato Pie

  • Start with pricking sweet potatoes all over with a fork and microwave on high until tender all the way to the center 10 to 15 minutes OR If you feel more comfortable baking them in the oven 425 degrees for about an hour until tender all the way to the center.
  • Scoop out the potato into a food processor and discard the skins. 
  • Pulse until smooth and add evaporated milk, brown sugar,  eggs, butter, brandy, vanilla,nutmeg, allspice and salt. 
  • Puree until very smooth scraping down the sides as needed. 
  • Pour the filling into the crust and bake the pie until puffed and just firm in the center for about 50 to 55 minutes. 
  • Lastly let the pie  cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving.   

Joshu Danny Ramirez Promoted To Sensei

By Current News, TSK, TSMMA Yonkers No Comments

Congratulations to Joshu Danny Ramirez (TSMA Yonkers) on his recent promotion to Sensei! 

Opening Thoughts From Shihan Tirelli

Observing the evolution from student to sensei is a very special experience. When Danny came to the school, he was a tough kid from good family in a not-so-nice neighborhood. As a student, he was meticulous, hard working and somewhat of a perfectionist; there wasn’t anything asked of Danny that he wouldn’t put his mind to in order to get it done – whether at the school, on the mat or in the ring. The relationship between student and sensei is not a one-way street, as much as I taught Danny, Danny taught me as well. When he began working at the school, he wasn’t there to get paid – it was the training and experience that he saw as invaluable. From his humble beginnings on the farms in Oaxaca to the streets of Yonkers, Danny worked hard, trained hard and fought hard. 

“Students should always try to be better than the teacher.” – Shihan Peter Tirelli

Joshu Danny Ramirez receives Sensei promotion

Danny’s Journey 

Danny Ramirez never envisioned himself teaching martial arts, let alone being a Sensei. If you asked Danny, the senior in high school, what his future held for him – he would’ve told he he wanted to be a gym teacher. After graduating high school, and trying college – he quickly realized that it wasn’t for him. He started looking everywhere for work but nothing came to fruition. When he came to train one day, he asked if he could start working at the gym. Expecting another door to be closed in his face, Danny was shocked when Shihan Tirelli told him that he starts tomorrow. 

From that day forward Danny never looked back. His love for kids and his ambition to be a gym teacher provided great structure in succeeding as an instructor. Danny also had passions to compete as well. If you ask him how it started out, he’d laugh and tell you it didn’t go so well. He started his career with two losses, but used those opportunities to learn and grow and has not suffered a loss since. He is 8-2-1 in kickboxing and still holds an undefeated record in MMA competitions. 

TSMA Yonkers' Danny Ramirez promoted to Sensei

Learn more about classes at Tiger Schulmann’s Yonkers 

Cooking With Sensei – Swedish Meatballs

By Diet and Nutrition, TSK No Comments

So you’re heading to a party, you need to bring a dish –  look no further! We  have the perfect-for-every-event dish to bring – Swedish Meatballs.  Even if you never made them before you are going to love them. They’re easy to make and truly a savory treat.  They true beauty in this dish is that they can be served either with a toothpick (KETO!) or even over noodles or brown rice in a small serving bowl.  

These little babies are protein packed and deliciously impressive! Let’s get started!

Quick & Easy Recipe For Swedish Meatballs

  • In a large, deep sauté pan heat the oil on medium heat and then add the onions for about 3 minutes. Next add the garlic to your onions for approximately another 1-2 minutes, (you should see the onions becoming translucent and the garlic gently browning. Be careful not to burn your garlic.) 
  • Now add the celery and parsley and cook for another 3-4 minutes. Set it aside and let the mixture cool.     
  • Then in a large bowl combine the beef, egg, cooled down onion mixture you just made, breadcrumbs, salt, pepper and the allspice.   
  • Now you’re ready to mix everything together and form the meatballs in your hands. (You should be visualizing them about the size of a whole walnut.) You’re looking to get about (24) small meatballs out of your mixture. While making them, it’s easiest to temporarily lay them down on a parchment lined cookie sheet so they won’t stick. 
  • Begin heating the beef stock on the stove top in the original pan. Bring it to boil and then reduce heat to medium low once its reached temperature. Now slowly drop in meatballs. Cover meatballs cooking in stock for about 20 minutes.  
  • Once cooked remove the meatballs with a slotted spoon and set aside in a serving dish.
  • Now strain the stock to clear and prep it for a sauce base. Add both stock and cream cheese to a blender. Pulse until smooth. Return the stock to pan, simmer a few minutes to thicken. Once thickened, pour your sauce over meatballs already plated in serving dish.
  • Lastly, garnish with your finely chopped parsley and serve. Remember, this dish can be served two ways: either over egg noodles for a small savory starter or simply with tooth picks if you prefer to set them out as a simple appetizer.



 Swedish Meatballs: The Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon – extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small onion – minced
  • 1 clove garlic – minced
  • 1 celery stalk – minced 
  • 1/4 cup parsley – finely chopped (leave aside a pinch or two for garnish)
  • 1 pound – lean ground beef 
  • 1 jumbo egg 
  • 1/4 cup – seasoned breadcrumbs (make your own or store bought, whichever is more convenient)
  • salt and pepper (to taste)
  • 1/2 teaspoon – allspice 
  • 2 cups – reduced sodium beef stock 
  • 2oz – light cream cheese 

Born & Bred | Mike Trizano

By TSK No Comments

Mike the lone wolf Trizano with his fists up in the air - Tiger Schulmann's born and bred


Mike Trizano is an undefeated professional MMA champion who’s been leading the pack since his early amateur days. A fierce competitor, he’s called “The Lone Wolf” because of his self-reliance and his keen instincts that explode into action once he enters the cage.

We caught up Mike to learn more about how growing up NJ, martial arts training, and teaching at Tiger Schulmann’s Paramus have pushed him to become the alpha he is today.

Where did you grow up? What was your family like?

I grew up Ramsey, NJ—very North Bergen County. My upbringing was nothing out of the ordinary. I have a great family: a younger brother, 2 great parents. I’m lucky to have been brought up and raised with the family I have. We were living in a wealthy area, but we weren’t rich. My parents made me work for everything I had in my life. From an early age, they instilled the value of hard work in me. I learned the principle of perseverance, and how to actually earn something, because nothing would be given to me. So from an early age, I learned that I need to just go out and work my butt off.

What brought you to Tiger Schulmann’s?

I didn’t really know what I wanted to do with my life. Out of high school, I probably would have gone into the military if not for my training at Tiger Schulmann’s. School was not for me. I tried it and couldn’t do it. It’s just not how I learn. I’m a physical learner; I have to be in the field doing it. You can teach me all you want on a blackboard, but it’s not going to click.

At 17, I took a more serious interest mixed martial arts training, and one of my buddies told me I should check out Tiger Schulmann’s, which was where his mom was training. I went in, took a class, and I was hooked immediately. I would go to school, then go to the gym. Sensei made sure I did all my homework, and then I’d help with kids classes, take my own three classes, then go home, sleep, wake up, and do it all over again. At that time, I played football, but then I quit my senior year to dedicate all of my time to martial art training.

How did your family support your decision to become a professional athlete?

In the beginning, they liked that I was working hard at something, but they weren’t 100% behind it. My parents wanted me to go to college, get a good 9-to-5 job, do the typical life thing. But that wasn’t for me. I can’t be behind a desk; I need to move around. It was a battle for a while; I fought with with my parents a lot over this.

At one point, I was going to school, working a separate job, training, and assisting at Tiger Schulmann’s—all at the same time. Something had to give. I was overwhelmed, and school—the thing that I cared least about—dropped. Eventually, I failed most of my classes because I just stopped going. I couldn’t do it anymore. I had 8:00 a.m. classes that I was missing because I would get home at 2:00 a.m., and then would still have to eat and do my laundry before going to bed.

So one day, I walked in, and my parents were sitting in the kitchen. I knew I was going to get a ‘talking to.’ In the back of my head, I was expecting this big lecture about school, how I got to stop training, but instead they told me they wanted me to stop going to school. When I heard that, it was like 10,000 pounds of stress was taken off of me. They said they saw how focused I was on training, and if that’s what I wanted to do, they supported it.

From that moment on, I dropped everything and then it was Tiger Schulmann’s 24/7: training and teaching. I started doing really well in competition, and things started taking off for me. I knew my parents were 100% behind me. And now, I’m in the UFC!

Before you started training, were you always a fan of MMA??

I was into it, but I was far from a diehard fan because I wasn’t too familiar with it. I associated combat with boxing, not MMA. When I was young, I remember my Dad made me watch Rocky, and that got me interested. When I first came to Tiger Schulmann’s, I didn’t think that I would do MMA, but when I started to train in other disciplines and could see how to put it all together, I saw how all these options combined could be so much more than just boxing with my hands.?

Were there other athletes you looked up to?

I never really looked up to anybody, but as like a fighter, one of the guys that I really loved watching was George St. Pierre. I loved his mentality and the technical aspect that he brought to the game. You gotta remember, at that time there weren’t as many technical fighters as there are now. It used to be more like wrestlers that brawl. He showed that you didn’t have to be a bigger or stronger guy if you had good technique. If you were crisp and solid, you would be able to piece people up. ?I learned so much from watching him.

What does your nickname, “The Lone Wolf,” mean to you?

?Because I’m the only one in that cage. Even though I have a huge support, I’m the one who goes in there trying to just rip the flesh off my opponent.

Think about it: a wolf has a pack for support and protection, but a “lone wolf” is more lethal because it’s got to be able to fend for itself—t can’t rely on others. When I’m competing, you have your coaches but they can’t jump in there and help you pull the guy off. In life, like in the cage, you got to rely on your instincts, and be able to adapt in whichever way possible at that moment to survive, to win, to be successful.

What was it like being on The Ultimate Fighter, and seeing yourself on TV?

It’s weird. Absolutely weird. I was the kind of person that laughed at people that were on reality shows. I always thought they were staged, but on The Ultimate Fighter, it wasn’t staged. Granted, there were some things that we had to do over because they didn’t like the angle of the shot or something like that. But we didn’t have scripts or anything. The whole experience was absolutely genuine.

What did your parents think about your being on TV?

Oh they loved it. They watched it every week. They would invite they would invite have people over to watch it with them. (Laughs)

Have you been recognized in public?

Once in a while.? I was out at a diner a couple of weeks ago, and a guy came up to me and asked, “Are you Mike Trizano?” I was like “Yeah.” He said he saw me on the show, and that he was a huge fan. I signed an autograph for him, haha. I mean, that’s only happened a few times, but it may happen more as I continue on with my career.

How are you preparing for your bout this weekend?

I’m working harder than I’ve ever worked before. I always? watch my last fight to look for improvement opportunities. There’s always something I can work on After each fight, I go right back to the drawing board, and I just try to learn and learn and learn. I focus on making sure that my cardio is good, and I’m always in solid shape. I push myself day in and day out and get better.

What do you want to be remembered for?

I would like to be remembered as someone who was inspirational for younger athletes coming up. Through my journey, I hope that I can show that if you have talent, and you work hard, you can be successful. That if you put your mind to something, you can do anything. You’re not limited to certain things because of situations that you’re in. People like to make excuses and say, “Oh I can’t do that, because of this.” No, you can do whatever you want. You’re only limiting yourself because you’re telling yourself you can’t do it. I truly believe that ANYBODY you know can do ANYTHING they want: it’s all in how your mind sees it. We can manifest negative things in our head for no reason. We can set limitations for ourselves for no reason. I want to send a positive the message for people that they can achieve what they dream if they put in the work.

Follow Mike on Social:

Instagram: @thelonewolfmma

Twitter: @TheLoneWolfMMA